Study: Teens Who Drink Alone More Likely to Develop Drinking Problems in Adulthood

Pittsburgh’s NPR Station:

The legal drinking age in the U.S. is 21, but as many people who’ve gone through high school and who are familiar with pop culture know, kids finds ways around that all the time.

A new study from researchers at the University of Pittsburgh finds that teens that do their drinking alone may be at greater risk for alcohol problems later in life.

“Most adolescents who drink alcohol do so in social settings,” said lead author Kasey Creswell. “Drinking alone can be considered a distinct form of alcohol use among teens given that the vast majority of teens who drink alcohol are doing so with their friends.”

The study found that teens who drink alone tend to drink more than their peers, and are more susceptible to heavy drinking and alcohol problems later in life. Solitary teen drinkers are also more likely to imbibe in response to negative emotions such as sadness, anger or loneliness.

Read the whole story: Pittsburgh’s NPR Station

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