Gauging the Intelligence of Infants

The New York Times:

This occasional column explores topics covered in Science Times 25 years ago to see what has changed — and what has not.

The claim about babies was startling: A test administered to infants as young as 6 months could predict their score on an intelligence test years later, when they started school.

“Why not test infants and find out which of them could take more in terms of stimulation?” Joseph F. Fagan III, the psychologist at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland who developed the test, was quoted as saying in an article by Gina Kolata on April 4, 1989. “It’s not going to hurt anybody, that’s for sure.”

Read the whole story: The New York Times

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