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Conference to Focus on Milgram Paradigm

Milgram_call_Dec2014The Obedience to Authority Conference will be held December 9–11, 2014, in Kolomna, Russia. The conference will focus on discussion of research in the field of Stanley Milgram’s experimental obedience paradigm. Russian and international researchers with diverse academic backgrounds and career levels are encouraged to register. For more information, visit www.milgram.ru/en.

 

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Current Directions in Psychological Science

Current Directions in Psychological Science: Volume 23, Number 4

Current Directions in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, publishes reviews by leading experts covering all scientific psychology and its applications.

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The Stability of Intelligence From Childhood to Old Age Ian J. Deary

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Adolescent and Adult Intellectual Development Phillip L. Ackerman

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Why Are There Different Age Relations in Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Comparisons of Cognitive Functioning? Timothy A. Salthouse

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Remembering the Past: Neural Substrates Underlying Episodic Encoding and Retrieval Arthur P. Shimamura

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Memory Constraints on Hypothesis Generation and Decision Making Rick Thomas, Michael R. Dougherty, and Daniel R. Buttaccio

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The Spatial Semantics of Symbolic Attention Control Bradley S. Gibson and Pedro Sztybel

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Early-Life Stress and Adult Inflammation Christopher…

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OCD Linked With Broad Impairments in Executive Function

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), characterized by intrusive and persistent thoughts that are often accompanied by repetitive or ritualized acts, is a serious clinical disorder that can significantly impact a person’s ability to function and go about daily life. Neuroimaging data have hinted at a link between OCD and brain areas that contribute to executive function (EF), a group of critical cognitive abilities that regulate lower-level cognitive processes.

This is a photo of a person washing his hands.As researcher Hannah Snyder of the University of Denver and colleagues explain, EFs allow us to “break out of habits, make decisions and evaluate risks, plan for the future, prioritize and sequence actions, and cope with novel situations.” EF deficits, therefore, could contribute to an inability to shift between tasks and the repetition and perseveration so often seen in individuals with OCD.

Despite evidence linking OCD with…

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‘The First State’ Achieves a First for Science-Based Clinical Training

Delaware and Illinois have become the first US states to enact legislation designed to strengthen science-centered education and training in clinical psychology and behavioral health.

Delaware Governor Jack Markell on July 28 signed House Bill 358 into law, permitting graduates from training programs accredited by the Psychological Clinical Science Accreditation System (PCSAS) to qualify for a state professional license. And on August 1, Illinois Governor Pat Quinn signed a similar piece of legislation.

PCSAS focuses on the quality and outcomes of scientific training of doctoral-level clinical psychologists. For years, the only accrediting body for clinical psychology training programs has been the Committee on Accreditation (CoA), which is governed by the American Psychological Association (APA). The new state laws give PCSAS the same accreditation standing as CoA, said APS Fellow Robert F. Simons, chair of the University of Delaware’s Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences and chair of the PCSAS…

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Typical Items Facilitate Fear Learning, Atypical Items Don’t

Have you ever recoiled at something because it reminds you of something else that you’re genuinely afraid of? Research indicates that people have a propensity to generalize their fear — so, for example, a person afraid of doctors might also feel uneasy at the sight of a hospital or medical equipment.

This is a photo of a woman covering her face in fear.Moreover, typical items in a category seem to lend themselves to generalization more than atypical items do. For instance, we’re more likely to generalize information about mice and apply it to bats rather than the other way around, since mice come to mind more easily when we think of mammals.

Bringing these different areas of research together, psychological scientists Joseph E. Dunsmoor and Gregory L. Murphy of New York University wanted to investigate whether we incorporate conceptual knowledge into fear…

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