26th APS Annual Convention: Mark Your Calendar (San Francisco, CA, USA - May 22-25, 2014)

2013 Theme Programs



Regulating the World, Regulating the Mind

Friday, May 24, 2013, 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM

Our childhoods alternated between agonizing efforts to be patient and acting out, our adult work life demands that we hold our tongues yet speak our minds, and our efforts at alternate construals are thwarted by rumination about immutable events of the day. We regulate our worlds: action, thought, and emotion. Learn why…if you can sit still long enough.

See posters related to this theme program in Poster Session V.

James J. Gross

John E. Bates
Indiana University, Bloomington

James J. Gross

Alicia A. Grandey
Pennsylvania State University

James J. Gross

James J. Gross
Stanford University

Yi-Yuan Tang

Yi-Yuan Tang
Texas Tech University

Yi-Yuan Tang

Roy F. Baumeister
Florida State University

 

 

Building a Better Psychological Science: Good Data Practices and Replicability

Friday, May 24, 2013, 1:00 PM – 5:50 PM

Psychological science has come of age. But the rights of a mature discipline carry with it responsibilities: to maximize confidence in our findings through good data practice and replication while simultaneously ensuring that funding sources and publication outlets support best practice. As we stand at the cross-road, leaders are proposing a road map.

For more on issues of replicability, see the November issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science:
Special Section on Replicability in Psychological Science: A Crisis of Confidence?

See posters related to this theme program in Poster Session IV.

Good Data Practices

Leslie K. John

Leslie K. John
Harvard Business School

Daniel Kahneman

Daniel Kahneman
Princeton University

Uri Simonsohn

Uri Simonsohn
University of Pennsylvania

Jelte M. Wicherts

Jelte M. Wicherts
Tilburg University, The Netherlands

Issues of Replicability

Larry V. Hedges

Larry V. Hedges
Northwestern University


Brian Nosek

Brian Nosek
University of Virginia


Hal E. Pashler

Hal E. Pashler
University of California, San Diego


Rebecca Saxe

Rebecca Saxe
Massachusetts Institute of Technology


Replication and Reliability in Research: Views from Editors, Program Officers and Publishers

Deanna Barch

Henry L. Roediger, III
Washington University in St. Louis


Deanna Barch

Deanna Barch
Washington University in St Louis


Eric Eich

Eric Eich
University of British Columbia, Canada


Robert M. Kaplan

Robert M. Kaplan
National Institutes of Health


Lynn Liben

Lynn Liben
Pennsylvania State University


Barbara A. Spellman

Barbara A. Spellman
University of Virginia


Richard M. Suzman

Richard M. Suzman
National Institute on Aging


Richard M. Suzman

Gary R. VandenBos
American Psychological Association

 

 

Biological Bases of Social Behavior

Saturday, May 25, 2013 12:30 PM – 3:40 PM

In response to recent advances in social neuroscience (broadly construed), this theme program will speak to the various ways that basic biological functions shape and underlie social behavior. The speakers will explore how an understanding of neuroscience, physiology, genetics, and endocrinology can foster a fuller, more consistent understanding of social behavior and of the person.

See posters related to this theme program in Poster Session XIII.

Jennifer A. Bartz

Jennifer A. Bartz
McGill University, Canada

John T. Cacioppo

John T. Cacioppo
University of Chicago

Susan T. Fiske

Susan T. Fiske
Princeton University

Eddie Harmon-Jones

Eddie Harmon-Jones
University of New South Wales, Australia

Shinobu Kitayama

Shinobu Kitayama
University of Michigan