26th APS Annual Convention: Mark Your Calendar (San Francisco, CA, USA - May 22-25, 2014)

PSPI Symposium

Psychological Science in the Public Interest

Friday, May 23, 2014, 4:00 PM - 5:50 PM
Franciscan Room A

Elaine F. Walker Chair: Elaine F. Walker
Emory University

The engaging reports in each issue of the APS journal Psychological Science in the Public Interest (PSPI) offer definitive and often provocative assessments by panels of distinguished scientists of what psychological science tells us about issues of broad public concern. This special symposium features authors of two recent or upcoming PSPI reports.

 

Craig D. Parks

Cooperation, Selfishness, Antagonism, and the Common Good
Craig D. Parks
Washington State University

PSPI report: "Cooperation, Trust, and Antagonism: How Public Goods Are Promoted"

Most people are frustratingly inconsistent in their willingness to voluntarily give resources toward a collectively beneficial entity, sometimes helping, sometimes obstructing, and sometimes opting out. We link research on human cooperation with work on ingroup/outgroup relations to create a model that explains this inconsistency and offers recommendations for remedying it.



Kathy Hirsh-Pasek

Using Our Science to Put the "Education" Back in Educational Apps
Kathy Hirsh-Pasek
Temple University
Children are surrounded by new digital technologies. Applications for digital devices are proliferating, and parents often think children are learning from “educational” apps even though many have not been tested or even informed by research. We present principles to guide evidence-based app development and uses that are aligned with known processes of children’s learning and development.


Roberta Michnick Golinkoff

Roberta Michnick Golinkoff
University of Delaware
Children are surrounded by new digital technologies. Applications for digital devices are proliferating, and parents often think children are learning from “educational” apps even though many have not been tested or even informed by research. We present principles to guide evidence-based app development and uses that are aligned with known processes of children’s learning and development.


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