25th APS Annual Convention: Mark Your Calendar (Washington, DC, USA - May 23-26, 2013)

APS Student Caucus

The Naked Truth Part I: Getting into Graduate School

Friday, May 24, 2013, 1:00 PM - 1:55 PM
Thurgood Marshall Ballroom South

James J. Hodge Chair: James J. Hodge
University of Vermont

Are you an undergraduate student with questions about graduate school? This panel features graduate students from various areas of psychological science who will share their experiences and offer advice on gaining admission to graduate school. The wide-ranging discussion will include advice on preparing for graduate school, managing the application process, and championing graduate school interviews.

 

Allison D. Cantor

Allison D. Cantor
Duke University
Allison is a first-year graduate student in the Cognition and Cognitive Neuroscience program at Duke University. Her research interests lie in the general area of human learning and memory. More specifically, she is interested in false memory, the impact of prior knowledge on memory, and applying cognitive psychology to enhance educational practice. Allison is an APSSC Campus Representative and a graduate mentor for the Mentorship Program.


Alyssa Fritz

Alyssa Fritz
University of Florida
Alyssa is currently a first year graduate student in the child track of the University of Florida's clinical and health psychology program. Her research interests include assessing psychosocial adjustment in children with craniofacial abnormalities. She also assists on a project designed to improve generalization of parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT) to school settings. Prior to attending the University of Florida, Alyssa received her Master's from the University of North Carolina Wilmington where she assessed discordance in child and parent-report of child witness status of parental interpersonal violence.


Tatiana Rojas Ospina

Tatiana Rojas Ospina
University of Connecticut
Tatiana is a PhD Candidate in the Cognition, Instruction, and Learning Technologies program at the University of Connecticut's Department of Educational Psychology. She is a Fulbright grantee with the support of the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana (Colombia), where she is a faculty member in the Department of Social Sciences. Tatiana has taught several courses at this university including Cognitive Processes, Cognitive Theories of Learning, and Educational Psychology. She received her Master’s degree in 2005 in Psychology from Universidad del Valle, Colombia, and her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology in 2000 from the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Colombia. Her dissertation proposal is titled “The Role of Active Problem-Solving in Promoting Far Transfer in Children.”


Jessica Schubert

Jessica Schubert
Binghamton University, State University of New York
Jessica graduated from Penn State Erie with a B.A. in Psychology in 2009 and is currently in her fourth year in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program at Binghamton University. Jessica specializes in exposure therapy for the treatment of anxiety disorders and her research interests focus on the etiology and maintenance of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Jessica received her M.S. in Clinical Psychology in 2011, and is currently writing a grant through the National Institutes of Mental Health to obtain funding for her dissertation study, which will examine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the severity of OCD symptoms in patients diagnosed with OCD.


 

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