Convergence: Connecting Levels of Analysis in Psychological Science
 In the past, our field harbored distinct, and often competing, schools of thought that tackled different problems and produced findings that often appeared to diverge. Today, investigators attack shared problems at complementary levels of analysis and produce results that converge. Studies of people in a social world; mental systems of cognition and emotion; and biological mechanisms of the genome and the nervous system interconnect and yield an integrated psychological science. The APS 23rd Annual Convention displays, and celebrates, these advances in our field.

Convention Program

The Association for Psychological Science's Annual Convention brings together psychological researchers and academics for an exciting program that covers the entire spectrum of innovative research in psychological science.

We're pleased to offer you this Online Program with detailed information about every presentation and event at the APS Convention.

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Sheraton Chicago Hotel & Towers
301 East North Water Street, Chicago, IL 60611
May 24 - May 27, 2012

James S. Jackson, University of Michigan Jackson's research focuses on how culture influences our health during our lives, attitude changes, and social support. He has contributed enormously to our understanding of such diverse perspectives as race relations and racism around the world. For example, his research has highlighted how racial discrimination can affect physical and mental health and treatment. Jackson is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the US National Academies, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a founding member of the Aging Society Research Network of the MacArthur Foundation. He is a recipient of the Association for Psychological Science (APS) James McKeen Cattell Fellow Award for his lifetime of significant intellectual achievements in applied psychological research.

 

Chair
Douglas L. Medin
Northwestern University

In this symposium four scholars analyze diversity in science and explore the ways in which the nature of science may depend on who is doing it.


Margaret Beale Spencer, University of Chicago

A professor of Urban Education, Spencer studies resiliency, identity, and competence formation processes for African-American, Hispanic, Asian-American, and Euro-American youth. She designed a CNN study to test racial bias in children and was awarded the 2006 Fletcher Fellowship, which recognized work that furthers the broad social goals of the U.S. Supreme Court's Brown v. Board of Education decision.

Helen E. Longino, Stanford University

Longino's teaching and research interests are in philosophy of science, philosophy of biology, social epistemology, and feminist philosophy. She has argued influentially for the significance of values and social interactions in the practices of science. Longino is well known for her books Science as Social Knowledge and The Fate of Knowledge.

Richard A. Shweder, University of Chicago

A professor of Human Development, Shweder is a cultural anthropologist whose research interests include psychological anthropology and cultural psychology. Over the past 40 years, he has conducted research in the Hindu temple town of Bhubaneswar, India. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship and the American Association for the Advancement of Science Socio-Psychological Prize.

Megan Bang, University of Washington

Bang's work is broadly focused on issues of culture, cognition and development. More specifically she focuses on community-based and culturally based science education. Her academic work has explored the kinds and forms of explanations, arguments, and attentional habits Native American children are exposed to and learn in community settings as they relate to school science learning.

 

Daniel Levitin, Aniruddh D. Patel, Carol L. Krumhansl and Victor Wooten 

Victor WootenIncluding a special concert with Dale Boyle, Kevin Feyen, Robert W. Levenson, Daniel Levitin, Bianca Levy, and featuring 
Victor Wooten
Five-Time Grammy Award Winner and 
Bassist for Béla Fleck & The Flecktones 

George A. Bonanno, Silvia H. Koller, Edna Foa, Dirk Helbing, and Lisa M. Shin

Joan Y. Chiao, Elissa Epel, Christine Dunkel Schetter, and Annette Karmiloff-Smith

 

Brenda Milner, McGill University

Through her work with the patient known as HM, Milner established a reputation as one of the most important neuroscientists of the 20th century. In working with HM, Milner found that people have multiple memory systems, opening the way for a greater understanding of how the brain works. Milner also conducted much of the early work that established how the different hemispheres of the brains interact. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Royal Society of London, and the Royal Society of Canada. Milner received the prestigious Pearl Meister Greengard Prize.

Margaret Beale Spencer, University of Chicago

A professor of Urban Education, Spencer studies resiliency, identity, and competence formation processes for African-American, Hispanic, Asian-American, and Euro-American youth. She designed a CNN study to test racial bias in children and was awarded the 2006 Fletcher Fellowship, which recognized work that furthers the broad social goals of the U.S. Supreme Court's Brown v. Board of Education decision.

Barry Schwartz, Swarthmore College

Schwartz's research investigates the decision-making processes that underlie our choices and examines how our choices make us feel. Schwartz's current research examines the role of "practical wisdom" – built on personal experience, ethics, and judgment in decision-making. Throughout his work, Schwartz blends insights from psychological science and economics to understand how we make decisions, how we come to value some things above others, and how we balance our sense of morality with our own self-interest.