Convergence: Connecting Levels of Analysis in Psychological Science
 In the past, our field harbored distinct, and often competing, schools of thought that tackled different problems and produced findings that often appeared to diverge. Today, investigators attack shared problems at complementary levels of analysis and produce results that converge. Studies of people in a social world; mental systems of cognition and emotion; and biological mechanisms of the genome and the nervous system interconnect and yield an integrated psychological science. The APS 23rd Annual Convention displays, and celebrates, these advances in our field.

APS Student Caucus Symposium

The Science of Clinical Psychology in the 21st Century: Where Do We Go From Here?

Friday, May 27, 2011, 1:00 PM - 2:50 PM
Lincoln West

Peter Vernig Chair: Peter Vernig
Suffolk University

Recent scientific advances have altered the way we understand and treat psychopathology, leading to the reemergence of clinical psychology as a scientific discipline dedicated to empirically-supported assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. To an increasing degree, psychologists have become integrated with the modern healthcare field, as the contribution of psychology to the multidisciplinary treatment of mental and physical illness has garnered greater recognition. This panel will bring together a diverse group of scientists on the cutting edge of scientific clinical psychology. Panelists will take questions from the audience and discuss their visions for the future of our field. Their experience and insight will be brought to bear as we ask the question, "Where do we go from here?"

Carlo C. DiClemente

Carlo C. DiClemente
University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Dr. DiClemente is a professor of psychology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. The co-developer of the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change, he is the author of numerous scientific articles, chapters, and books (including Changing for Good and Addiction and Change). Dr. DiClemente is a fellow of APS and has received the Innovators Combating Substance Abuse award by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the McGovern award from the American Society of Addiction Medicine.


Raymond DiGiuseppe

Raymond DiGiuseppe
St. John’s University
Dr. Raymond DiGiuseppe studies anger as a clinical problem as a form of psychopathology. He has researched and developed Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy, the Anger Disorders Scale, and Cognitive Behavior Therapies. After earning his Ph.D. from Hofstra University, he completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Albert Ellis Institute where he became Director of Professional Education. Dr. DiGiuseppe helped create a doctoral program in school psychology at St. John's University where he is currently the chair of the psychology department. He has also helped to develop the Diplomate in Behavioral Psychology and is a former President of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy (ABCT). Dr. DiGiuseppe has contributed to the scientific and clinical literature with six books, more than 120 chapters and articles, and hundreds of conference presentations.


Rise B. Goldstein

Rise B. Goldstein
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
Dr. Goldstein earned her Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts (Amherst) and has conducted extensive research for over 20 years on clinical presentation, comorbidity, and treatment utilization in alcohol and other drug use, mood, anxiety, and personality disorders. Since joining the NIAAA Laboratory of Epidemiology and Biometry as a Staff Scientist in 2004, she has been extensively involved in research supporting the SUD Workgroup’s revision of diagnostic criteria for DSM-V.


Richard G. Heimberg

Richard G. Heimberg
Temple University
Richard Heimberg is Professor and Director of the Adult Anxiety Clinic of Temple University. He is Past President of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies and President-Elect of the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology. He is best known for his work on treatments for social anxiety disorder.


Michael J. Kozak

Michael J. Kozak
National Institute of Mental Health
Dr. Kozak earned his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and has studied process and outcome of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for anxiety. He is the Chief of the NIMH Adult Psychopathology and Psychosocial Intervention Research Branch. Dr. Kozak was a member of the Workgroup on Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder for the DSM-IV and is a member of the NIMH Workgroup on Research Domain Criteria.


Bonnie Spring

Bonnie Spring
Northwestern University
Dr. Spring earned her Ph.D. from Harvard University and is a Professor and Director of Behavioral Medicine at Northwestern University. She is a Past President of the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM) and a recipient of SBM’s Distinguished Research Mentor award. Her research on behavioral risk factors (smoking, diet, physical inactivity, obesity) has been funded continuously since 1976 by grants from NIH, AHA, ACS, and the VA.


Antonette M. Zeiss

Antonette M. Zeiss
Department of Veterans Affairs
Antonette M. Zeiss, Ph.D., is Acting Deputy Chief Patient Care Services Officer for Mental Health in the Department of Veterans Affairs. In this role, she is responsible for enhancing and transforming VA mental health services, which includes emphasis on implementation of evidence-based practices in mental health on a broad, systemic basis.


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