Convergence: Connecting Levels of Analysis in Psychological Science
 In the past, our field harbored distinct, and often competing, schools of thought that tackled different problems and produced findings that often appeared to diverge. Today, investigators attack shared problems at complementary levels of analysis and produce results that converge. Studies of people in a social world; mental systems of cognition and emotion; and biological mechanisms of the genome and the nervous system interconnect and yield an integrated psychological science. The APS 23rd Annual Convention displays, and celebrates, these advances in our field.

Invited Symposium

Multilevel Phenomena and Multilevel Theorizing

Saturday, May 28, 2011, 10:30 AM - 11:50 AM
Jefferson East

Gregory A. Miller Chair: Gregory A. Miller
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and University of Konstanz, Germany

Advocacy of integration across levels of analysis is commonplace. Discussions of how to do it are rare. Are concepts or phenomena reducible across levels? Can causal mechanisms cross levels? The symposium will consider the relationship between neural and psychological domains and some implications for translation to clinical application.

Michael S. Gazzaniga

Michael S. Gazzaniga
University of California, Santa Barbara

Michael Gazzaniga in the news: Wired (Sept 23, 2010) and National Post (Nov 3, 2010).


Michael J. Kozak

Michael J. Kozak
National Institute of Mental Health


Gregory A. Miller

Gregory A. Miller
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and University of Konstanz, Germany


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