Email Bookmark and Share

Symposium

Electronic Media Use: Relations to Adolescents' Psychosocial and Academic Adjustment and Safety

Sunday, May 30, 2010, 10:30 AM - 11:50 AM
Back Bay Ballroom C

Chair: Eric F. Dubow
Bowling Green State University

Cell phone and internet use has dramatically increased among adolescents, raising concerns of parents, educators, and researchers about possible effects on youths’ health, psychosocial adjustment, and safety. This symposium examines psychosocial correlates of youths’ texting behavior, and the roles of cell phones and the internet in crimes of youth victimization.

The Relation Between Adolescents' Frequency of Text Messaging and Risky Texting Behaviors: The Role of Perceptions of Harm and Parent Monitoring
Lisa Reinemann
Bowling Green State University
This paper examines the relation between frequency of texting and engaging in risky texting behaviors (e.g., texting while driving, sending inappropriate messages via text). Nearly 30 percent of the students reported sending over 100 text messages daily; 34 percent admitted to sending a hurtful text at least once and 33 percent of those students who were drivers reported texting while driving almost every day. Frequency of texting was positively related to compulsive texting (e.g., lose sleep due to texting, try to hide the amount of texting) and engaging in risky texting behaviors. Perceived harm from texting moderated the relation between frequency of texting and risky texting behaviors.

Co-Author:
Eric F. Dubow, Bowling Green State University

The Relation Between Adolescents' Compulsive Text Messaging and Psychosocial and Academic Adjustment: The Role of Motivations for Texting
Sarah E. Domoff
Bowling Green State University
In this paper, we found that higher levels of compulsive texting related to higher levels of internalizing symptoms, aggression, and poorer academic adjustment. Some motivations for texting moderated this relation (e.g., there was a stronger positive relation between compulsive texting and internalizing symptoms for those students who more highly endorsed escapism as their motivation for texting). These results highlight the importance of social cognitive factors (e.g., perceptions of harm, motivations for texting) that condition the relation between texting and negative outcomes.

Co-Author:
Eric F. Dubow, Bowling Green State University

The Role of Cell Phones in Internet-facilitated Sexual Exploitation of Minors: Differences between Online Meeting and Prior Relationship Cases
Kaitlin Lounsbury
Crimes against Children Research Center, University of New Hampshire
In this paper, the role of cell phones in online meeting and more traditional sexual abuse cases involving identified juvenile victims was explored. Arrest cases were categorized according to how the victim and offender met (online versus prior relationship) and whether they communicated by cell phone at any point during the crime. Findings indicate that cell phone use is associated with several unique risk behaviors and more severe case outcomes.

Use of Social Networking Sites in Online Sex Crimes Against Minors: An Examination of National Prevalence and Means of Utilization
Kimberly J. Mitchell
Crimes against Children Research Center, University of New Hampshire
This paper discusses the variety of ways social networking sites (SNSs) are used to facilitate the sexual exploitation of youth as well as identify victim, offender, and case differences between arrests with and without a SNS nexus. An estimated 2,322 arrests involved SNSs in some way: to initiate sexual relationships, as a means of communication between victim and offender, to access information about the victim, and to disseminate information or pictures about the victim. We discuss implications for investigation and prevention of these crimes.

Go back