ICPS 2015

Integrative Science Symposia

Solutions to our most pressing scientific questions come from cross-cutting efforts in which investigators deploy diverse research methods and attack problems at multiple levels of analysis. ICPS will showcase these efforts in thematic Integrative Science Symposia featuring leading investigators from not only psychological science, but also neuroscience, genetics, sociology, economics, anthropology, linguistics, and related fields. Each Integrative Science Symposium will be paired with Cutting-Edge Methodological Workshops that will provide scientific skill-building opportunities for all conference attendees.
Psychology in an Economic World: Cognition, Brain, Behavior,
and Development in Socioeconomic Contexts
Location: Graanbeurszaal
Thursday, 12 March, 16:00 - 18:20
Psychological science, once criticized for underestimating the impact of socioeconomic factors on psychological development and functioning, now plays a lead role in advancing our understanding of how wealth and poverty affect thought, emotion, and action throughout our lives. This symposium presents an international panel of researchers whose inquiries reveal the ways in which economic well-being impacts psychological development, brain development, cognitive functioning, and psychological well-being. The symposium will not only present the latest research at the intersection of neuroscience, human development, sociology, and economics, it will also show how integrative advances in psychological science can move beyond the laboratory to beneficially shape social policy.
  • DANIEL CERVONE (Chair)
  • Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA
  • Martha J. Farah
  • Department of Psychology and Center for Neuroscience & Society, University of Pennsylvania, USA
  • CYNTHIA GARCÍA COLL
  • Provost - Carlos Albizu University, San Juan, PR, USA
  • JÜRGEN SCHUPP
  • Research Unit Socio-Economic Panel Study, German Institute for Economic Research, DIW Berlin, Germany
  • ELDAR SHAFIR
  • Department of Psychology and The Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, USA
Assessing Psychological Change
Location: Graanbeurszaal
Friday, 13 March, 8:30 - 10:50
Methodological advances throughout psychological science present novel opportunities for investigators in clinical psychological science. Today's clinical scientists can draw upon a multiplicity of measures, developed in diverse parts of our fields, as they explore questions of psychological change. In this symposium, researchers will bring self-report, performance, hormonal, and brain-imaging methods to bear on the assessment of change in a wide range of psychological disorders. Their efforts promise to deepen our understanding of disorders, treatments, and the temporal unfolding of change processes.
  • Eva Gilboa-Schechtman (Chair)
  • Department of Psychology, Bar-Ilan University, Israel
  • WOLFGANG LUTZ
  • Department of Psychology, University of Trier, Germany
  • JAN DE HOUWER
  • Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Belgium
  • URS M. NATER
  • Department of Psychology,
    University of Marburg, Germany
  • CYNTHIA FU
  • School of Psychology, University of
    East London, United Kingdom
  • CHRIS R. BREWIN
    (Discussant)
  • Department of Clinical Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, United Kingdom
Religion Past and Present: Evolutionary Origins and Contemporary Functions of Spirituality
Location: Effectenbeurszaal
Friday, 13 March, 8:30 - 10:50
In the ancient past, much of humanity believed in supernatural agents with powers that exceeded those of mere mortals, and engaged in community-wide rituals in which those agents were honored. Today, much of humanity believes in supernatural agents with powers that exceed those of mere mortals and engages in community-wide rituals in which those agents are honored. What was, and is, the role of religious beliefs and practices in psychological experience and social life? In this symposium, a unique gathering of leading anthropologists and psychologists will explore religion past and present by addressing the origins of religious thought, the dissemination of religious beliefs, and the role of religion in individual development, identity, behavior, and well-being.
  • Arnaud Rey (Chair)
  • CNRS & Aix-Marseille University, France
  • PASCAL R. BOYER
  • Department of Psychology,
    Washington University in St. Louis, USA
  • JACQUELINE S. MATTIS
  • Department of Psychology,
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA
  • VASSILIS SAROGLOU
  • Department of Psychology, Division of Social
    Psychology, and Centre for Psychology of Religion, Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium
  • HARVEY WHITEHOUSE
  • Institute of Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology University of Oxford, United Kingdom
Lifespan Development of Executive Control
Location: Graanbeurszaal
Friday, 13 March, 14:00 - 16:20
We start life as impulsive infants, with limited control over our actions. We develop into adults who can control our impulsive actions and emotions (sometimes with varying degrees of success - but that's for another program). Today's integrative advances in development science shed light on the social experiences, psychological systems, and brain mechanisms that enable this gradual emergence of executive control. Panelists in this symposium will present their latest findings on the neural and cognitive processes that enable the developing individual to make increasingly complex decisions, attain greater flexibility in goal-directed behavior, and achieve executive control over thought and action.
  • Terry K. Au (Chair)
  • Department of Pyschology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
  • YUKO MUNAKATA
  • Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, USA
  • PHILIP D. ZELAZO
  • Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota, USA
  • EVELINE CRONE
  • Department of Developmental and Educational Psychology, Leiden University, The Netherlands
  • JUTTA KRAY
  • Department of Psychology, Saarland University, Germany
  • ANNETTE D. KARMILOFF-SMITH (Discussant)
  • Department of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck, University of London, United Kingdom
Non-Verbal Communication
Location: Effectenbeurszaal
Friday, 13 March, 14:00 - 16:20
Research on non-verbal communication has historically focused on emotional facial expressions, but anyone who has seen the slumped shoulders of defeat can tell you that there is much more to the story than the expressions we show on our faces. Researchers have enriched the story of nonverbal communication in recent years, advancing our understanding of the roles that other visual signals, such as body postures, and signals from other modalities, such as sound, play in expressing thought and emotion. This interdisciplinary symposium will explore the many ways in which moving beyond facial expressions to examine the perception and production of postures and voices enhances our understanding of the perceptual and communicative processes that happen both within and between individuals.
  • Anne Maass (Chair)
  • Department of Developmental Psychology and Socialisation, Universitá di Padova, Italy
  • DAVID A. PUTS
  • Department of Anthropology and Center for Behavior, Brain, and Cognition,
    The Pennsylvania State University, USA
  • BEATRICE DE GELDER
  • Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, The Netherlands
  • KLAUS R. SCHERER
    (Speaker and Discussant)
  • Department of Psychology and Educational
    Sciences, University of Geneva, Switzerland
  • JESSICA L. TRACY
  • Department of Psychology,
    University of British Columbia, Canada
THE INTERGENERATIONAL TRANSMISSION OF PSYCHOPATHOLOGY
Location: Graanbeurszaal
Saturday, 14 March, 8:30 - 10:50
Health records tend to reduce family history of mental illness down to a checkbox or two, but understanding how psychopathology is transmitted from one generation to the next requires us to pay attention to the nuances and complexities of various psychological, social, and biological processes. This panel of preeminent scientists will explore the intergenerational transmission of psychopathology through the simultaneous lenses of genetic and behavioral analysis, examining processes at varying degrees of specificity - from general parenting practices to specific psychological disorders. Through these explorations, the speakers will illustrate how multiple levels and angles can help us elucidate the neural, cognitive, and emotional mechanisms through which early experiences impact adult outcomes. This multi-method, multidisciplinary approach promises to yield important insights that may improve well-being for both individuals and whole societies.
  • Annette D. Karmiloff-Smith (Chair)
  • Department of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck, University of London, United Kingdom
  • JAY BELSKY
  • Department of Human Ecology, University of California, Davis, USA
  • DEBORAH M. CAPALDI
  • Oregon Social Learning Center, USA
  • MICHAEL E. LAMB
  • Department of Psychology, University of
    Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • MICHAEL J. MEANEY
  • Research Centre, Douglas Mental Health
    University Institute, and Departments of
    Psychiatry and Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University, Canada
  • MARINUS H. VAN IJZENDOORN
  • Centre for Child and Family Studies, Leiden University, and Centre for Moral Socialization Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Making Sense: Society, Culture, and Meaning Systems
Location: Effectenbeurszaal
Saturday, 14 March, 8:30 - 10:50
The environment delivers light and sound, but we experience meaning: declarations and commands, questions and worries, intimacies and evasions. How does the light and sound that we see and hear become meaningful communications that inform us about the world, others, and ourselves? Answering this question requires integrative psychological science that analyzes mechanisms that lie under the skull and those that play a role in human relationships through which understanding is established. In this symposium, an international roster of investigators crosses traditional disciplinary borders to advance the science of making sense.
  • GÜN R. SEMIN
    (Chair and Discussant)
  • Faculty of Psychology, ISPA - Instituto Universitário, Portugal; Utrecht University, The Netherlands
  • SHIHUI HAN
  • Cultural and Social Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Peking University, China
  • BENJAMIN K. BERGEN
  • Language and Cognition Lab, Department of Cognitive Science, University of California, San Diego, USA
  • HANNE DE JAEGHER
  • Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science, University of the Basque Country, San Sebastián, Spain; and Centre for Computational Neuroscience and Robotics and COGS, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK
  • ELINOR OCHS
  • UCLA Center for Language, Interaction, and Culture, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
e-RELATIONSHIPS
Location: Graanbeurszaal
Saturday, 14 March, 14:00 - 16:20
The Internet not only is a tool for obtaining information and entertainment. It is also, for millions, the forum in which people maintain old relationships, develop new ones, and establish a social identity. The explosive growth of Internet use demands an integrative science that explores the ways in which e-relationships contribute to socialization processes, skill development and personal adjustment, and the formation of friendships and romantic relationships. Examining how we navigate these digital relationships allows us to address several pressing questions: How do our online relationships affect our perceptions of ourselves and our peers? How do these effects compare with those of offline relationships? How do we manage our online relationships to meet our informational, social, and romantic needs? This program will explore the ever-increasing role that e-relationships play in the social lives of people of all ages.
  • MARION K. UNDERWOOD (Chair & Speaker)
  • School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, The University of Texas at Dallas, USA
  • NICOLE ELLISON
  • School of Information, University of Michigan, USA
  • ELI J. FINKEL
  • Departments of Psychology and Management & Organizations, Northwestern University, USA
  • PATTI M. VALKENBURG
  • Center for Research on Children, Adolescents, and the Media, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • HARRY T. REIS
    (Discussant)
  • Department of Clinical and Social Sciences in
    Psychology, University of Rochester, USA
Understanding and Training Attention and the Conscious Mind
Location: Effectenbeurszaal
Saturday, 14 March, 14:00 - 16:20
Attention! The word itself conveys the psychological challenge: Focusing consciousness on one stream of information, while one's mind seems continually to wander off to another. How and why do people pay - and fail to pay - attention to a task at hand? Answering this question requires multilayered scientific efforts that explore the nature of conscious experience, the cognitive networks that enable people to focus attention, the neural circuitry that underpins the cognitive abilities, and the potential impact of training experiences on attentional control. In this symposium, an international roster of renowned cognitive scientists and neuroscientists call ICPS's attention to cutting edge advances in study of attention and the conscious mind.
  • Arnaud Rey (Chair)
  • CNRS & Aix-Marseille University, France
  • NILLI LAVIE
  • Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience,
    University College London, United Kingdom
  • Axel N. Cleeremans
  • Center for Research in Cognition & Neurosciences, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium
  • JONATHAN W. SCHOOLER
  • Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
  • YI-YUAN TANG
  • Department of Psychology,
    Texas Tech University, USA
  • TANIA SINGER
  • Department of Social Neuroscience,
    Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Germany
Intensive Longitudinal Data and Dynamical Systems
Location: Administratiezaal
Saturday, 14 March, 14:00 - 16:20
Technological developments - including smart phones and wearable electronic devices - solve one research problem: How to obtain intensive data on multiple individuals across time and social contexts. But they introduce another: How to analyze the waves of data that come in. Statistical techniques that can uncover treasures hidden in intensive longitudinal data are not fully developed, but are advancing rapidly. In this symposium, four speakers at the cutting edge of these advances will present the intensive longitudinal data-analytic methods that they have developed - and that you can employ, too.
  • Ellen Hamaker (Chair)
  • Department of Methods and Statistics, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
  • NIALL P. BOLGER
  • Department of Psychology,
    Columbia University, USA
  • DENNY BORSBOOM
  • Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Ulrich W. Ebner-Priemer
  • Department of Sport and Sport Science, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
  • MARIEKE WICHERS
  • University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands